Mariella Hunt

Thoughts on PHANTOM OF THE OPERA


This is a reprint from Mariella’s blog.

Phantom of the Opera is, in a word, scary. Not so much because of Erik’s appearance or circumstances, but simply because it exposes brutally how far a longing soul will go to find love. The desperation to find a reason to live will drive the most intelligent person to madness, to the point where they cannot see right from wrong–all that matters to them is fulfillment of that deep, human longing for acceptance and caring arms to hold you.

“If I am the phantom, it is because man’s hatred has made me so. If I am to be saved it is because your love redeems me.”

This is not to say I wasn’t frightened many a time by scenes in the book, where the description was phenomenal, putting me at the edge of my seat. I’d read this book before two years ago and these scenes did not frighten me like now. I’m not sure if its because I’m older and have become a better reader, but every scene just hi
Phantom of the Opera
is, in a word, scary. Not so much because of Erik’s appearance or circumstances, but simply because it exposes brutally how far a longing soul will go to find love. The desperation to find a reason to live will drive the most intelligent person to madness, to the point where they cannot see right from wrong–all that matters to them is fulfillment of that deep, human longing for acceptance and caring arms to hold you.

“If I am the phantom, it is because man’s hatred has made me so. If I am to be saved it is because your love redeems me.”

This is not to say I wasn’t frightened many a time by scenes in the book, where the description was phenomenal, putting me at the edge of my seat. I’d read this book before two years ago and these scenes did not frighten me like now. I’m not sure if its because I’m older and have become a better reader, but every scene just hit home, and where the author wanted to scare me he certainly did.

“None will ever be a true Parisian who has not learned to wear a mask of gaiety over his sorrows and one of sadness, boredom, or indifference over his inward joy.”

I’ve not seen the movie, though for years I’ve meant to. A goal of mine is to finally watch it before the year ends, and perhaps learn more about the opera which inspired such a disturbing masterpiece. Often a novel’s history is just as fascinating as the story itself, making everything seem real and 3D. A world of beauty, of stories, can be found right here–nestled in buildings we see every day.

“He [Erik] had a heart that could have held the entire empire of the world; and, in the end, he had to content himself with a cellar.”

Phantom has sealed its spot on my shelf of all-time favorites, and this spot it shall keep. The book is an eye-opener to the darkness that resides deep within a human soul, and which spirals out of control when a person is neglected and abandoned. No amount of intelligence can fill in for lack of love, and without love one can become–without even meaning to–a monster, frightening to everyone they know, but to themselves most of all.

“Erik is not truly dead. He lives on within the souls of those who choose to listen to the music of the night.”

t home, and where the author wanted to scare me he certainly did.

“None will ever be a true Parisian who has not learned to wear a mask of gaiety over his sorrows and one of sadness, boredom, or indifference over his inward joy.”

I’ve not seen the movie, though for years I’ve meant to. A goal of mine is to finally watch it before the year ends, and perhaps learn more about the opera which inspired such a disturbing masterpiece. Often a novel’s history is just as fascinating as the story itself, making everything seem real and 3D. A world of beauty, of stories, can be found right here–nestled in buildings we see every day.

“He [Erik] had a heart that could have held the entire empire of the world; and, in the end, he had to content himself with a cellar.”

Phantom has sealed its spot on my shelf of all-time favorites, and this spot it shall keep. The book is an eye-opener to the darkness that resides deep within a human soul, and which spirals out of control when a person is neglected and abandoned. No amount of intelligence can fill in for lack of love, and without love one can become–without even meaning to–a monster, frightening to everyone they know, but to themselves most of all.

“Erik is not truly dead. He lives on within the souls of those who choose to listen to the music of the night.”

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